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image: Opinion: Justice Delayed, Health Denied

Opinion: Justice Delayed, Health Denied

By | June 4, 2012

African justice systems must change to help curb HIV and tuberculosis transmission in prisons.

12 Comments

image: Rapid Bird Flu Test

Rapid Bird Flu Test

By | June 4, 2012

New PCR assay can detect more than 40 strains of H5N1 in a single go.

1 Comment

image: Cartographer of Metabolic Pathways Dies

Cartographer of Metabolic Pathways Dies

By | June 4, 2012

A biochemist who mapped the ways in which molecular pathways interact passed away at age 96.

2 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | June 1, 2012

The Aha! Moment, Imagine, Ignorance, and The Age of Insight

0 Comments

image: Avant-Garde Science

Avant-Garde Science

By | June 1, 2012

Why naked mole-rats and experimental gene therapies remind me of groundbreaking artists.

0 Comments

image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Mara Crossing</em>

Book Excerpt from The Mara Crossing

By | June 1, 2012

Author Ruth Padel tells the stories of John James Audubon and cellular migration in prose and verse

1 Comment

Contributors

June 1, 2012

Meet some of the people featured in the June 2012 issue of The Scientist.

0 Comments

image: Microbiology Goes High-Tech

Microbiology Goes High-Tech

By | June 1, 2012

Out with toothpicks and pipettors; in with automation.

0 Comments

image: Food's Afterlife

Food's Afterlife

By | May 25, 2012

Meals left to mold develop colors, mycelia, and beads of digested juices, sparking the eye of an artist, and the slight concern of a mycologist.

0 Comments

image: 2012 Bio-Art Winners

2012 Bio-Art Winners

By | May 25, 2012

Check out the 10 images that won FASEB's first annual Bio-Art competition.

0 Comments

Popular Now

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