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image: Neural Stem Cells Sprout Long Axons

Neural Stem Cells Sprout Long Axons

By | August 7, 2014

Early neurons reprogrammed from human skin cells show unprecedented axonal growth in a rat model of spinal cord injury.

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image: Beyond Cat Killing

Beyond Cat Killing

By | August 1, 2014

Capsule reviewed author Ian Leslie sets up his latest book, Curious, about the human propensity to wonder and learn.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | August 1, 2014

The Myth of Mirror Neurons, Curious, Shadow Medicine, and Doctored

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | August 1, 2014

Meet some of the people featured in the August 2014 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Small Packages

Small Packages

By | August 1, 2014

When proverbs come true

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | August 1, 2014

August 2014's selection of notable quotes

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image: A Vaulted Mystery

A Vaulted Mystery

By | August 1, 2014

Nearly 30 years after the discovery of tiny barrel-shape structures called vaults, their natural functions remain elusive. Nevertheless, researchers are beginning to put these nanoparticles to work in biomedicine.

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image: Next Generation: See-through Mice

Next Generation: See-through Mice

By | July 31, 2014

An improved tissue-clearing technique makes whole animals transparent.

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image: Zebrafish Brain in Action

Zebrafish Brain in Action

By | July 28, 2014

Researchers use light-sheet microscopy to map central nervous system activity in zebrafish larvae.

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image: Week in Review: July 21–25

Week in Review: July 21–25

By | July 25, 2014

Blood-based Alzheimer’s diagnostics; CRISPR cuts out HIV; Leishmania and the sand fly microbiome; deconstructing the lionfish science fair debacle

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