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» PCR, cell & molecular biology and immunology

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image: Gingers More Prone to Skin Cancer

Gingers More Prone to Skin Cancer

By | November 2, 2012

Researchers identify an unexpected molecular explanation for the higher incidence of skin cancer in redheads.

5 Comments

image: Coming to Terms

Coming to Terms

By | November 1, 2012

New noninvasive methods of selecting the most viable embryo could revolutionize in vitro fertilization.

11 Comments

image: Creative Emulsification

Creative Emulsification

By | November 1, 2012

Enhancing data collection from emulsion PCR reactions: three case studies

0 Comments

image: Erica Larschan: Hitting Her Targets

Erica Larschan: Hitting Her Targets

By | November 1, 2012

Assistant Professor, Molecular Biology, Cell Biology, & Biochemistry Brown University, Age: 36

1 Comment

image: Omega-3s: Fishing for a Mechanism

Omega-3s: Fishing for a Mechanism

By | November 1, 2012

Despite abundant evidence supporting their ability to help prevent and treat cardiovascular disease, the therapeutic effectiveness of fish oil–derived fatty acids remains controversial.

4 Comments

image: PCR Usage and Preferences

PCR Usage and Preferences

By | November 1, 2012

Quantitative real-time technology dominates the market today but digital PCR is on the rise.

0 Comments

image: Exit Strategy

Exit Strategy

By | November 1, 2012

Large RNA-protein packets use a novel mechanism to escape the cell nucleus.

0 Comments

image: Long and Rocky Roads

Long and Rocky Roads

By | November 1, 2012

From basic research to beneficial therapies

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image: Fair Flu Viruses Closely Matched

Fair Flu Viruses Closely Matched

By | October 30, 2012

A study finds that the genomes of swine and human flu viruses associated with a county fair in Ohio are almost perfectly matched, suggesting interspecies transmission.

0 Comments

image: Bacterial Cocktail Treats Infection

Bacterial Cocktail Treats Infection

By | October 29, 2012

Mice fed a mix of six strains of bacteria were able to fight a C. difficile infection that causes deadly diarrhea and is resistant to most types of treatment.

2 Comments

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