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image: When Stress Is Good

When Stress Is Good

By | February 1, 2011

Fast blood flow protects against atherosclerosis: implications for treatment

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image: Time and Temperature

Time and Temperature

By | February 1, 2011

Editor's choice in physiology

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Losers Fight Back

By | February 1, 2011

Editor's choice in developmental biology

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Speaking of Science

By | February 1, 2011

February 2011's selection of notable quotes

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Down but Not Out

By | February 1, 2011

Cells on standby are surprisingly busy.

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image: Appealing Choice

Appealing Choice

By | January 1, 2011

A book is born from pondering why sexual selection was, for so long, a minor component of evolutionary biology.

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image: Eau de Choice

Eau de Choice

By | January 1, 2011

Evolutionary biologist Jane Hurst at the University of Liverpool has found that male mice have evolved a cunning trick to distinguish themselves within the dating pool: they produce a specific protein that drives female attraction to male scent, and this molecule, called darcin, helps females remember a specific male's odor.

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Myc, Nicked

By | January 1, 2011

Editor's Choice in Developmental Biology

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image: The Evolution of Volvox

The Evolution of Volvox

By | January 1, 2011

The volvocine algae are a model system for studying the evolution of multicellularity, as the group contains extant species ranging from the unicellular Chlamydomonas to a variety of colonial species and the full-fledged multicellular Volvox varieties.

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From Simple To Complex

By | January 1, 2011

The switch from single-celled organisms to ones made up of many cells has evolved independently more than two dozen times. What can this transition teach us about the origin of complex organisms such as animals and plants?

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