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» PCR, developmental biology and ecology

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image: An Unlichenly Pair

An Unlichenly Pair

By | August 1, 2011

A young botanist pays tribute to his mentor by naming a newly discovered, rare species in his honor.

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Contributors

August 1, 2011

Meet some of the people featured in the August 2011 issue of The Scientist.

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Fisheries scientist ordered to refuse interviews about research on salmon decline.

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image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | July 25, 2011

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

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image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | July 13, 2011

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

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image: Circadian Signs of Aging

Circadian Signs of Aging

By | July 13, 2011

The neural nexus of the circadian clock shows signs of functional decline as mice age, providing clues as to why sleep patterns tend to change as people grow older.

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image: Repeated Regeneration

Repeated Regeneration

By | July 12, 2011

A 16-year-long newt study finds that regeneration remains efficient with repetition and age.

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image: Top 7 in Developmental Biology

Top 7 in Developmental Biology

By | July 12, 2011

A snapshot of the most highly ranked articles in developmental biology and related areas, from Faculty of 1000.

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image: Cellular Salve

Cellular Salve

By | July 8, 2011

Ivan Martin talks about the promise of using cell-based therapies to regenerate joint cartilage.

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image: Dead Cane Toads Are Deadly

Dead Cane Toads Are Deadly

By | July 5, 2011

The deadly-when-eaten invasive amphibians that have been plaguing Australian wildlife for years continue to poison even after they’re dead.

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