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image: Finding Injury

Finding Injury

By | September 1, 2012

The brain’s phagocytes follow an ATP bread trail laid down by calcium waves to the site of damage.

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image: Space-bound Fish

Space-bound Fish

By | July 31, 2012

Japanese astronauts deliver an aquarium to the International Space Station to study the effects of microgravity on marine life.

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image: Questioning the HIV Cure

Questioning the HIV Cure

By | June 12, 2012

Sensitive tests reveal the Berlin patient believed to be cured of HIV still carries HIV RNA and antibodies.

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image: Rapid Bird Flu Test

Rapid Bird Flu Test

By | June 4, 2012

New PCR assay can detect more than 40 strains of H5N1 in a single go.

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image: Grading on the Curve

Grading on the Curve

By | June 1, 2012

Actin filaments respond to pressure by forming branches at their curviest spots, helping resist the push.

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image: Growing Human Eggs

Growing Human Eggs

By | June 1, 2012

Germline stem cells discovered in human ovaries can be cultured into fresh eggs.

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image: Microbiology Goes High-Tech

Microbiology Goes High-Tech

By | June 1, 2012

Out with toothpicks and pipettors; in with automation.

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image: Doubled Gene Boosted Brain Power

Doubled Gene Boosted Brain Power

By | May 7, 2012

Human-specific duplications of a gene involved in brain development may have contributed to our species’ unique intelligence.

6 Comments

image: Stem Cell Suicide Switch

Stem Cell Suicide Switch

By | May 3, 2012

Human embryonic stem cells swiftly kill themselves in response to DNA damage.

10 Comments

image: The Sugar Lnc

The Sugar Lnc

By | May 1, 2012

Genes that react to cellular sugar content are regulated by a long non-coding RNA via an unexpected mechanism

2 Comments

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