The Scientist

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image: Flashy Deep Sea Fish

Flashy Deep Sea Fish

By | March 5, 2014

Fish with complex light-emitting photophore patterns may be primed to split into new species.

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image: More Mutations in Girls with Autism

More Mutations in Girls with Autism

By | March 4, 2014

A greater number of genetic mutations among autistic girls, compared to their male counterparts, suggests that the female brain can better handle such variations.  

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Capsule Reviews

By | March 1, 2014

The Sixth Extinction, Joy, Guilt, Anger, Love, Ha! The Science of When we Laugh and Why, and Ten Thousand Birds

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Contributors

By | March 1, 2014

Meet some of the people featured in the March 2014 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Discovering Archaea, 1977

Discovering Archaea, 1977

By | March 1, 2014

Ribosomal RNA fingerprints reveal the three domains of life.

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image: Early Evidence

Early Evidence

By | March 1, 2014

Fossilized structures suggest that mat-forming microbes have been around for almost 3.5 billion years.

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Speaking of Science

By | March 1, 2014

March 2014's selection of notable quotes

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image: Week in Review: February 24–28

Week in Review: February 24–28

By | February 28, 2014

New PLOS data sharing rules; mouse cortical connectome published; reprogramming astrocytes into neurons and fibroblasts into hepatocytes

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image: New Cortical Connectome Online

New Cortical Connectome Online

By | February 27, 2014

Researchers offer a freely available map of the connections throughout the mouse cortex.  

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image: Making New Spinal Neurons

Making New Spinal Neurons

By | February 25, 2014

With a single gene, scientists reprogram supporting cells in the spines of living mice into new neurons.

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