The Scientist

» PCR, evolution and disease/medicine

Most Recent

image: Opinion: Science Counterculture

Opinion: Science Counterculture

By | December 9, 2013

On taking DIYbio to the next level

5 Comments

image: A Cancer Culprit in Autoimmunity

A Cancer Culprit in Autoimmunity

By | December 5, 2013

Scientists discover that cancer can drive the autoimmune disorder scleroderma.

0 Comments

image: Reliable Flu Forecaster

Reliable Flu Forecaster

By | December 5, 2013

A model that tracked last winter’s flu season could accurately predict peak outbreaks across the United States.

0 Comments

image: Wolfish Social Skills

Wolfish Social Skills

By | December 4, 2013

According to a new study, wolves can learn from humans.

1 Comment

image: Bipedal Beginnings

Bipedal Beginnings

By | December 4, 2013

Re-examination of a thigh bone from one of the earliest putative hominins could impact scientists’ understanding of the origins of human bipedalism, a study suggests.

0 Comments

image: Opinion: Of Mice and Men

Opinion: Of Mice and Men

By | December 3, 2013

Researchers scramble to put mouse cancer models on solid footing.

1 Comment

image: Biology's Coefficient

Biology's Coefficient

By | December 1, 2013

Joel Cohen uses the tools of mathematics to deconstruct questions of life.

0 Comments

image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Accidental Species</em>

Book Excerpt from The Accidental Species

By | December 1, 2013

In Chapter 7, “The Way We Walk,” author Henry Gee describes the first steps taken by the ancestors of Homo sapiens.

0 Comments

image: PCR: Past, Present, & Future

PCR: Past, Present, & Future

By | December 1, 2013

Highlights from a webinar held by The Scientist to celebrate 30 years of PCR: the technique's invention, quantitative real-time PCR, and digital PCR

0 Comments

image: Standing Up for Sex

Standing Up for Sex

By | December 1, 2013

Humans evolved the ability to walk on two legs because it allowed them to more accurately size up prospective mates. Or did they?

8 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Opinion: Why I Published in a Predatory Journal
    News & Opinion Opinion: Why I Published in a Predatory Journal

    My “colleagues” and I at the fictitious Arthur Vandelay Urological Research Institute were surprised to find our bogus “uromycitisis” case report swiftly accepted, with only minor revisions requested.

  2. Consilience, Episode 3: Cancer, Obscured
  3. Genetic Analysis Reveals the Evolutionary History of Dogs
  4. Record-Setting Corn Grows 45 Feet Tall
AAAS