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image: Sights (and Signs) of #StandUpForScience

Sights (and Signs) of #StandUpForScience

By | February 19, 2017

Hundreds of people gathered in Boston’s Copley Square today to show support for science.

3 Comments

image: Henrietta Lacks’s Family Seeks Compensation

Henrietta Lacks’s Family Seeks Compensation

By | February 16, 2017

Family members of Lacks, the donor behind the widely used HeLa cell line, are planning to sue Johns Hopkins University.

1 Comment

image: Opinion: Sometimes, Scientists Must March

Opinion: Sometimes, Scientists Must March

By , , and | February 13, 2017

Lessons learned from the “Death of Evidence” demonstration in Canada

9 Comments

image: Science Policy in 2017

Science Policy in 2017

By | February 13, 2017

The Scientist’s coverage of key science agencies, the early days of the Trump administration, and the March for Science

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image: USDA Removes Animal Welfare Data From Public Website

USDA Removes Animal Welfare Data From Public Website

By | February 7, 2017

Due to privacy concerns, the US Department of Agriculture will no longer make animal welfare inspection reports and enforcement records public.

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image: Artificial Cells Talk to Real Ones

Artificial Cells Talk to Real Ones

By | February 1, 2017

Nonliving cells developed in the lab can communicate chemically with living bacteria, according to a study.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | February 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the February 2017 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Plant Photoreceptor Doubles as a Thermometer

Plant Photoreceptor Doubles as a Thermometer

By | February 1, 2017

Warmth acts on a light-sensing protein similarly to the way shade does, setting off a growth spurt in plant seedlings.

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image: Infographic: Dual-Purpose Photoreceptor

Infographic: Dual-Purpose Photoreceptor

By | February 1, 2017

See how different environmental conditions affect the activity of a molecule sensitive to both light and temperature.

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image: Infographic: Following the Force

Infographic: Following the Force

By | February 1, 2017

Physical forces propagate from the outside of cells inward and vice versa.

0 Comments

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