The Scientist

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image: Book Excerpt from Tibet Wild

Book Excerpt from Tibet Wild

By | December 1, 2012

In the introduction to his latest book, renowned naturalist George Schaller describes the evolving role of the field biologist through the lens of his experiences with Himalayan wildlife.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | December 1, 2012

Unusual Creatures, Extinct Boids, The Mating Lives of Birds and A World in One Cubic Foot

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | December 1, 2012

Meet some of the people featured in the December 2012 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Playing the Field

Playing the Field

By | December 1, 2012

The role of field biologists is changing as conservation biology evolves and ecological challenges mount.

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image: Polly Wanna Genome?

Polly Wanna Genome?

By | December 1, 2012

Puerto Rican businesses and residents come together to support the genomic sequencing of the island’s only native parrot species, hoping to help protect the endangered bird.

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image: Coughing Seashells

Coughing Seashells

By | November 28, 2012

A type of scallop expels water and waste through a sort of cough that could reveal clues about water quality.

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image: Beetles Warm BC Forests

Beetles Warm BC Forests

By | November 27, 2012

Using satellite data, researchers calculate that mountain pine beetle infestations raise summertime temperatures in British Columbia’s pine forests by 1 degree Celsius.

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image: Old New Species

Old New Species

By | November 20, 2012

Decades can pass between the discovery of a new animal or plant and its official debut in the scientific literature.

4 Comments

image: No Sex Required

No Sex Required

By | November 19, 2012

An all-female species, distantly related to flatworms, steals all of genetic material it needs to diversify its genome.

2 Comments

image: Little Fish in a Big Pond

Little Fish in a Big Pond

By | November 1, 2012

Continued overfishing of forage fish such as sardines and herring can result in devastating ecological and economic outcomes.

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