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image: Why DBS Works for Parkinson’s?

Why DBS Works for Parkinson’s?

By | April 14, 2015

Deep-brain stimulation may effectively treat slow movement, tremor, and rigidity in Parkinson’s patients by reducing synchronicity of neural activity in the motor cortex.

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image: 23andMe, Genentech Partner on Parkinson’s

23andMe, Genentech Partner on Parkinson’s

By | January 7, 2015

Firms enter a multi-year deal for the analysis of whole-genome sequence data, with an eye toward drug discovery for Parkinson’s disease.

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image: Viviana Gradinaru: Clearing the Way

Viviana Gradinaru: Clearing the Way

By | December 1, 2014

Assistant Professor, Department of Biology and Biological Engineering, Caltech. Age: 33

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image: Say

Say "Aaaah"

By | August 1, 2014

Scientists aim to remotely monitor Parkinson’s through voice recordings.

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image: Lozano on DBS

Lozano on DBS

By | November 1, 2013

Neurosurgeon Andres Lozano discusses deep-brain stimulation in this TEDx talk.

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image: Tuning the Brain

Tuning the Brain

By | October 28, 2013

Deep-brain stimulation is allowing neurosurgeons to adjust the neural activity in specific brain regions to treat thousands of patients with myriad neurological disorders.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | October 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the October 2013 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Smell and the Degenerating Brain

Smell and the Degenerating Brain

By | October 1, 2013

An impaired sense of smell is one of the earliest symptoms of Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and some other neurodegenerative diseases. Could it be a useful diagnostic tool?

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image: A Root Cause of Parkinson’s

A Root Cause of Parkinson’s

By | November 15, 2012

Misfolded α-synuclein proteins promote the spread of Parkinson’s pathology in mouse brains.

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image: New Culprit for Parkinson’s?

New Culprit for Parkinson’s?

By | October 17, 2012

Scientists use human stem cells to show that nuclear defects may play a role in Parkinson’s disease, and suggest a way to reverse the problem.

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