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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | April 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Guts and Glory

Guts and Glory

By | April 1, 2016

An open mind and collaborative spirit have taken Hans Clevers on a journey from medicine to developmental biology, gastroenterology, cancer, and stem cells.

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image: Shooting for the Moon

Shooting for the Moon

By | April 1, 2016

Defeating cancer is many times more difficult than planting a flag on our lunar satellite.

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image: Tumor Traps

Tumor Traps

By | April 1, 2016

After surgery to remove a tumor, neutrophils recruited to the site spit out sticky webs of DNA that aid cancer recurrence.

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image: A Different Way of Doing Things

A Different Way of Doing Things

By | April 1, 2016

Cancer cells exhibit altered metabolic processes that may serve as promising targets for new therapies.

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image: Metabolic Reprogramming

Metabolic Reprogramming

By | April 1, 2016

How cancer cells fuel their rapid growth

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image: More Support for Allergen-Exposure Strategy

More Support for Allergen-Exposure Strategy

By | March 8, 2016

A second study finds evidence that feeding children peanuts could help prevent them from developing allergies to the legume later in life.

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image: Viral Remnants Help Regulate Human Immunity

Viral Remnants Help Regulate Human Immunity

By | March 3, 2016

Endogenous retroviruses in the human genome can regulate genes involved in innate immune responses.

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image: Amoebae Have Human-Like Immunity

Amoebae Have Human-Like Immunity

By | March 2, 2016

Dictyostelium discoideum produce extracellular nets that can kill bacteria, just as phagocytes in people and other higher animals do, according to a study.

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image: Giant Virus Has CRISPR-like Immune Defense

Giant Virus Has CRISPR-like Immune Defense

By | March 2, 2016

The genome of a mimivirus strain resistant to a virophage has repeated phage sequences alongside nuclease- and helicase-coding sections.

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