The Scientist

» metabolism and immunology

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image: Slumber Numbers

Slumber Numbers

By | March 1, 2016

Ideas abound for why some animal species sleep so much more than others, but definitive data are elusive.

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image: Sugar Time

Sugar Time

By | March 1, 2016

Metabolic activity, not light, drives the circadian clock in cyanobacteria.

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image: Go To Bed!

Go To Bed!

By | March 1, 2016

The immediate consequences of losing out on sleep may be harbingers of long-term repercussions.

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image: Under the Cover of Darkness

Under the Cover of Darkness

By | March 1, 2016

The far-reaching effects of sleep loss

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image: Mutations Not Tied to Metastasis

Mutations Not Tied to Metastasis

By | February 25, 2016

Clinical cases link immune changes to a cancer’s spread through the body, but find no role for so-called “driver” mutations.

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image: Single Antibody Protects Macaques from Ebola

Single Antibody Protects Macaques from Ebola

By | February 25, 2016

The “just right” binding properties of a monoclonal antibody from an Ebolavirus survivor help it neutralize the virus.

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image: Anti-Inflammatory Drugs as Antivenom?

Anti-Inflammatory Drugs as Antivenom?

By | February 24, 2016

Compounds typically used to calm the immune system can prevent death from scorpion venom in mice, researchers report.

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image: Premature Assault?

Premature Assault?

By | February 9, 2016

Plants may trick bacteria into attacking before the microbial population reaches a critical size, allowing the plants to successfully defend the weak invasion.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | February 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the February 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Fungal Security Force

Fungal Security Force

By | February 1, 2016

In yew trees, Taxol-producing fungi function as an immune system to ward off pathogens.

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