Advertisement

The Scientist

» metabolism and ecology

Most Recent

image: How Meat Can Harm Arteries

How Meat Can Harm Arteries

By | November 5, 2014

Gut microbes produce a key intermediate metabolite that promotes atherosclerosis in a mouse model of red meat consumption.

0 Comments

image: Virus Decimating Spanish Amphibians

Virus Decimating Spanish Amphibians

By | October 20, 2014

Several toad, newt, and salamander populations are being hit hard by an emerging pathogen in a pristine national park in Spain.

0 Comments

image: Antibiotics Linked to Childhood Obesity

Antibiotics Linked to Childhood Obesity

By | October 1, 2014

Taking multiple courses of common antibiotics before the age of 2 may increase a child’s risk of obesity.

7 Comments

image: Contributors

Contributors

By | October 1, 2014

Meet some of the people featured in the October 2014 issue of The Scientist.

1 Comment

image: Muscle to Mind

Muscle to Mind

By | September 25, 2014

Exercise-induced muscle metabolites protect the brain from stress-induced depression in a mouse model. 

1 Comment

image: Cave-dwelling Fish Fail to Keep Time

Cave-dwelling Fish Fail to Keep Time

By | September 25, 2014

Tetra fish adapted to extreme darkness lose circadian metabolic rhythms to conserve energy, according to a study. 

0 Comments

image: Bird Diversity Drops From Forests to Farms

Bird Diversity Drops From Forests to Farms

By | September 11, 2014

Farms support less phylogenetically diverse bird populations than forests, but some farms are better than others.

0 Comments

image: Six-Legged Syringes

Six-Legged Syringes

By | September 1, 2014

Researchers whose work requires that they draw blood from wild animals are finding unlikely collaborators in biting insects.

2 Comments

image: The Iceman Cometh

The Iceman Cometh

By | September 1, 2014

Meet Ötzi, the Copper Age ice man who is helping scientists reconstruct changes in the population genetics of the red deer he hunted.

0 Comments

image: This Bug Sucks

This Bug Sucks

By | September 1, 2014

An assassin bug, which some researchers are using as living syringes to sample blood from birds and mammals, feeds on a bat.

2 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Opinion: Making Progress by Slowing Down
  2. A Case of Sexual Ambiguity, 1865
    Foundations A Case of Sexual Ambiguity, 1865

    This year marks the 150th anniversary of an autopsy report describing the first known case of a sexual development disorder.

  3. Influential Cancer Biologist Dies
  4. Image of the Day: Colorful Corn
Advertisement
NeuroScientistNews
NeuroScientistNews
Advertisement
Life Technologies