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image: Urban Owl-Fitters

Urban Owl-Fitters

By | December 1, 2015

How birds with an innate propensity for living among humans are establishing populations in cities


image: Spiders, Prey Leave DNA

Spiders, Prey Leave DNA

By | November 30, 2015

A study of black widow spiders suggests that the arachnids leave traces of their own genetic material and DNA from prey in their sticky webs.


image: How Gastric Bypass Can Kill Sugar Cravings

How Gastric Bypass Can Kill Sugar Cravings

By | November 19, 2015

A type of bariatric surgery eliminates gut-to-brain signals that trigger sugar highs, a mouse study shows.  

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image: Cold Mice Skewing Data?

Cold Mice Skewing Data?

By | November 16, 2015

Another study finds that housing experimental mice at lower-than-optimal temperatures may alter research outcomes, this time with regard to inflammation and diet.


image: A Weighty Anomaly

A Weighty Anomaly

By | November 1, 2015

Why do some obese people actually experience health benefits?


image: Microbesity


By | November 1, 2015

Obesity appears linked to the gut microbiome. How and why is still a mystery—but scientists have plenty of ideas.


image: The Skinny on Fat Cells

The Skinny on Fat Cells

By | November 1, 2015

Bruce Spiegelman has spent his career at the forefront of adipocyte differentiation and metabolism.


image: Breaking the Cancer-Obesity Link

Breaking the Cancer-Obesity Link

By , and | November 1, 2015

Obese people are at higher risk for developing cancer, have worse prognoses once diagnosed, and are often resistant to chemotherapy regimens. The question is, Why?


image: Obesogens


By | November 1, 2015

Low doses of environmental chemicals can make animals gain weight. Whether they do the same to humans is a thorny issue.


image: Fat Factors

Fat Factors

By | November 1, 2015

A mouse's exposure to certain environmental chemicals can lead the animal—and its offspring and grandoffspring—to be overweight.

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