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image: Man and Bird Chat While Honey Hunting

Man and Bird Chat While Honey Hunting

By | July 25, 2016

A study suggests that humans and avians in sub-Saharan Africa communicate to find and mutually benefit from the sweet booty.

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image: Primates, Gut Microbes Evolved Together

Primates, Gut Microbes Evolved Together

By | July 21, 2016

Symbiotic gut bacteria evolved and diverged along with ape and human lineages, researchers find. 

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image: Another Dinosaur with Short Arms Discovered

Another Dinosaur with Short Arms Discovered

By | July 14, 2016

Gualicho shinyae evolved small limbs independently of T. rex, researchers report.

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Mismatched ancestral origins of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA boost mouse health.

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image: A New Role for Marine Archaea

A New Role for Marine Archaea

By | July 1, 2016

Researchers discover acetogenesis in archaea, suggesting an important role for these little-studied organisms in generating organic carbon below the seafloor.

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image: Hot Off the Presses

Hot Off the Presses

By | July 1, 2016

The Scientist reviews Serendipity, Complexity, The Human Superorgasism, and Love and Ruin

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image: Marine Bacteria Share Carbon Assimilation Duties

Marine Bacteria Share Carbon Assimilation Duties

By | July 1, 2016

Taxonomic differences in bacterioplankton amino acid uptake

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image: Multicellular Cooperation Curbs Cheating

Multicellular Cooperation Curbs Cheating

By | July 1, 2016

An experimental evolution study shows that more cheaters arise when bread mold fungal cells are less related to one another.

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image: What Causes Type 2 Diabetes?

What Causes Type 2 Diabetes?

By | July 1, 2016

Insulin resistance and high levels of insulin and lipids all precede the development of metabolic dysfunction. Which metabolic factor is to blame?

9 Comments

image: Source of Scales, Feathers, Hair

Source of Scales, Feathers, Hair

By | June 27, 2016

Reptiles, birds, and mammals all produce tiny, bump-like structures during development.   

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