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image: Denisovan DNA Reveals Human Roots

Denisovan DNA Reveals Human Roots

By | November 19, 2015

The ancient genomes of 50,000-year-old Denisovan teeth suggest the extinct species lived alongside Neanderthals and modern humans.

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image: Supergene Explains Ruff Mating

Supergene Explains Ruff Mating

By | November 18, 2015

Two sequencing studies reveal the genetics underlying the sexual behavior of the European and Asian birds.

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image: Cold Mice Skewing Data?

Cold Mice Skewing Data?

By | November 16, 2015

Another study finds that housing experimental mice at lower-than-optimal temperatures may alter research outcomes, this time with regard to inflammation and diet.

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image: Incan Mummy Genome Sequenced

Incan Mummy Genome Sequenced

By | November 16, 2015

Researchers decode mitochondrial DNA from the 500-year-old remains of a native South American child, revealing a new line of maternal ancestors.

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image: Three Origins for Rice?

Three Origins for Rice?

By | November 3, 2015

Rice was domesticated three separate times across Asia, a new study suggests.

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image: Allele Linked to Obesity in People

Allele Linked to Obesity in People

By | November 3, 2015

A single nucleotide polymorphism in BDNF is tied with lower levels of the protein and higher body-mass index.

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image: A Weighty Anomaly

A Weighty Anomaly

By | November 1, 2015

Why do some obese people actually experience health benefits?

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image: Microbesity

Microbesity

By | November 1, 2015

Obesity appears linked to the gut microbiome. How and why is still a mystery—but scientists have plenty of ideas.

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image: Remote Mind Control

Remote Mind Control

By | November 1, 2015

Using chemogenetic tools to spur the brain into action

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image: The Skinny on Fat Cells

The Skinny on Fat Cells

By | November 1, 2015

Bruce Spiegelman has spent his career at the forefront of adipocyte differentiation and metabolism.

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