The Scientist

» social media, microbiology and evolution

Most Recent

image: Gut Microbes for Life

Gut Microbes for Life

By | July 4, 2013

Most strains of gut microbes stay with us for decades, which may prove useful for tracking our health.

6 Comments

image: Foot Fungus Revealed

Foot Fungus Revealed

By | July 2, 2013

A new study profiles the garden of fungal organism that grows on human feet.

1 Comment

image: Opinion: Tweeting to the Top

Opinion: Tweeting to the Top

By | July 2, 2013

The lines between scholarly and traditional forms of popular communication are fading, and scientists need to take advantage.

0 Comments

image: Crowd Control

Crowd Control

By | July 1, 2013

Molecules, cells, or vertebrates—when individuals move and act as a single unit, surprisingly complex behaviors arise that hint at the origins of multicellularity.

7 Comments

image: Image of the Day: <em>E. coli</em> Hunter

Image of the Day: E. coli Hunter

By | June 27, 2013

The Shiga toxin may help E. coli survive predation by the protist Tetrahymena.

0 Comments

image: Horse Genome Is Oldest Ever Sequenced

Horse Genome Is Oldest Ever Sequenced

By | June 26, 2013

By sequencing the genome of a 700,000-year-old horse, researchers have pushed back the time of DNA survival by almost an order of magnitude.

3 Comments

image: Darwin Cleared of Plagiarism

Darwin Cleared of Plagiarism

By | June 26, 2013

A new book by an evolution historian asserts that Darwin and Wallace developed their theories of evolution independently.

1 Comment

image: Evolution Takes a Road Trip

Evolution Takes a Road Trip

By | June 1, 2013

Highways and byways are among the man-made environmental alterations driving the evolution of animals on contemporary timescales, with implications for ecology.

3 Comments

image: In Evolution's Garden

In Evolution's Garden

By | June 1, 2013

Raising one evolutionary question after another, Brandon Gaut has harvested a crop of novel findings about how plant genomes evolve.

4 Comments

image: Mobile Microscopes

Mobile Microscopes

By | June 1, 2013

Turning cell phones into basic research tools can improve health care in the developing world.

5 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Humans Never Stopped Evolving
    Features Humans Never Stopped Evolving

    The emergence of blood abnormalities, an adult ability to digest milk, and changes in our physical appearance point to the continued evolution of the human race.

  2. An Aging-Related Effect on the Circadian Clock
  3. Marching for Science, from Berlin to Sydney
  4. Opinion: Is a Clone Really Born at Age Zero?
Business Birmingham