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image: Biologist Ruffles Feathers on Facebook

Biologist Ruffles Feathers on Facebook

By | October 19, 2012

The blogosphere voices widespread condemnation for a sexist comment made by a researcher attending this week’s annual Society for Neuroscience conference.

8 Comments

image: Brain Scans Predict Reading Skills

Brain Scans Predict Reading Skills

By | October 9, 2012

New research shows that the growth of long-range connections between brain regions predicts how well a child will learn to read.

0 Comments

image: Growing New Neurons

Growing New Neurons

By | October 4, 2012

Brain cells called pericytes can be reprogrammed into neurons with just two proteins, pointing to a novel way to treat neurodegenerative disorders.

5 Comments

image: The Salinella salve Mystery

The Salinella salve Mystery

By | October 1, 2012

Salinella salve, an organism described as a single layer of cells, ciliated on both inner and outer surfaces and surrounding…

0 Comments

image: Gone Missing, circa 1892

Gone Missing, circa 1892

By | October 1, 2012

A unique organism sighted only once, more than a century ago, could shed light on the evolution of multicellularity—if it ever actually existed.

3 Comments

image: Home Cookin’

Home Cookin’

By | October 1, 2012

Laboratory-raised populations of dung beetles reveal a mother's extragenetic influence on the physiques of her sons.

2 Comments

image: Sex Matters

Sex Matters

By | October 1, 2012

Researchers reveal a new pathway of synaptic modulation in the hippocampus exclusive to females.

0 Comments

image: Lamarck and the Missing Lnc

Lamarck and the Missing Lnc

By | October 1, 2012

Epigenetic changes accrued over an organism’s lifetime may leave a permanent heritable mark on the genome, through the help of long noncoding RNAs.

21 Comments

image: Evolving Dependence

Evolving Dependence

By | September 27, 2012

Scientists unravel the confusing molecular biology behind a fruit fly’s reliance on a single type of cactus.

1 Comment

image: Removing the Optimism Bias

Removing the Optimism Bias

By | September 24, 2012

Disrupting a small part of the brain with a magnetic field can reduce people’s prejudice towards good news.

8 Comments

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