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image: Dual Adaptation in Deaf Brains

Dual Adaptation in Deaf Brains

By | February 12, 2013

The brains of people who cannot hear adapt to process vision-based language, in addition to brain changes associated with the loss of auditory input. 

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image: Image of the Day: Cerebral Infiltration

Image of the Day: Cerebral Infiltration

By | February 11, 2013

An illustration depicting the damaging effects of a tumor (red) on structural connections within the brain

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image: Scaring Those Who Have No Fear

Scaring Those Who Have No Fear

By | February 5, 2013

Scientists found a way to cause panic attacks in women with amygdala damage.

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image: A Window into the Mind

A Window into the Mind

By | February 1, 2013

Researchers have generated an image of thoughts flitting through the brains of zebrafish.

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image: Why Mice Like Massages

Why Mice Like Massages

By | February 1, 2013

Researchers pinpoint a gene marker for neurons sensitive to gentle touch such as grooming.

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image: Flickering Neurons

Flickering Neurons

By | February 1, 2013

Fluorescent calcium sensors in transgenic mice give a real-time readout of neuronal activity.

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image: Athletes Are Champion Visual Learners

Athletes Are Champion Visual Learners

By | January 31, 2013

Pro athletes can learn to parse a complicated moving visual scene faster than most.

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image: The Sound of Salt

The Sound of Salt

By | January 30, 2013

A putative ion channel integral to mammalian hearing turns out to be an elusive salt-sensing chemoreceptor in nematode worms.

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image: Neurologist Faked Stroke Data

Neurologist Faked Stroke Data

By | January 28, 2013

A University of Wisconsin neuroscientist is found guilty of falsifying Western blots as part of his stroke research, and has requested the retraction of two papers.

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image: The Making of a Bully

The Making of a Bully

By | January 25, 2013

Adolescent rats exposed to stress grow into pathologically aggressive adults, behaviors that may be explained by accompanying epigenetic changes and altered brain activity.

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