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Top 7 From F1000

By | March 1, 2011

A snapshot of the highest-ranked articles from a 30-day period on Faculty of 1000

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Opening a Can of Worms

By | February 1, 2011

A father’s determination to help his son resulted in an experimental treatment for autism that uses roundworms to modulate inflammatory immune responses. Can the worms be used to treat other diseases?

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image: The Worm Crew

The Worm Crew

By | February 1, 2011

Meet the people behind studies that use nematodes to treat inflammatory diseases. 

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Parasites Unite!

By | February 1, 2011

Gabriele Sorci discusses how invaders can band together to more effectively infect hosts.

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image: Book excerpt from <em>Everyday Practice of Science</em>

Book excerpt from Everyday Practice of Science

By | February 1, 2011

In Chapter 3, “Credibility: Validating Discovery Claims,” author Frederick Grinnell details the difficulty in making discoveries that buck current scientific paradigms.

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Speaking of Science

By | February 1, 2011

February 2011's selection of notable quotes

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Capsule Reviews

By | February 1, 2011

Quirk, Darwin's Armada, The Death & Life of Monterey Bay, Elegance in Science

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image: The Evolution of Credibility

The Evolution of Credibility

By | February 1, 2011

The winding path that an interesting result takes to become a bona fide discovery is just one of the topics covered in this new book on the practice of science.

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Appealing Choice

By | January 1, 2011

A book is born from pondering why sexual selection was, for so long, a minor component of evolutionary biology.

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Mail

By | January 1, 2011

A selection of comments from our readers

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