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image: Head Scratchers

Head Scratchers

By | September 1, 2014

Many natural phenomena elude our understanding.

5 Comments

image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | September 1, 2014

September 2014's selection of notable quotes

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image: Beyond the Blueprint

Beyond the Blueprint

By , , and | September 1, 2014

In addition to serving as a set of instructions to build an individual, the genome can influence neighboring organisms and, potentially, entire ecosystems.

8 Comments

image: On the Other Hand

On the Other Hand

By | September 1, 2014

Handedness, a conspicuous but enigmatic human trait, may be shared by other animals. What does it mean for evolution and brain function?

7 Comments

image: Walking Fish Model Evolution

Walking Fish Model Evolution

By | August 28, 2014

Raising a semi-terrestrial species on land highlights the role of developmental plasticity in the evolutionary transition from water to land.

3 Comments

image: How Long Is Too Long?

How Long Is Too Long?

By | August 27, 2014

Readers discuss the varied amounts of time they’ve waited for journals to respond to or act on their concerns regarding published papers.

2 Comments

image: Social Data for Ebola Surveillance

Social Data for Ebola Surveillance

By | August 26, 2014

Algorithms that map social media posts and mobile phone data can help researchers track epidemics.

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image: Chimps Empath-eyes?

Chimps Empath-eyes?

By | August 25, 2014

Chimpanzees may reinforce social bonds by involuntarily mimicking a fellow chimp’s pupil size.

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image: How Hummingbirds Taste Nectar

How Hummingbirds Taste Nectar

By | August 21, 2014

Hummingbirds perceive sweetness through a receptor with which other vertebrates taste savory foods. 

1 Comment

image: Obscured Like an Octopus

Obscured Like an Octopus

By | August 21, 2014

Cephalopod skin inspires engineers to design sheets of adaptive camouflage sensors. 

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