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image: Gut Microbes Trigger Malaria-Fighting Antibodies

Gut Microbes Trigger Malaria-Fighting Antibodies

By | December 4, 2014

A carbohydrate antigen found on cells of E. coli and other species prompts a potent immune response against malaria-causing parasites in mice.

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image: All Systems Go

All Systems Go

By | December 1, 2014

Alan Aderem earned his PhD while under house arrest for protesting apartheid in South Africa. His early political involvement has guided his scientific focus, encouraging fellow systems biologists to study immunology and infectious diseases.


image: Bespoke Cell Jackets

Bespoke Cell Jackets

By | December 1, 2014

Scientists make hydrogel coats for individual cells that can be tailored to specific research questions.


image: Poor Little Devils

Poor Little Devils

By | November 1, 2014

See the devastating infectious cancer that may drive the Tasmanian Devil to extinction.


image: Science Gone Social

Science Gone Social

By , , , and | October 1, 2014

Scientists are beginning to embrace social media as a viable means of communicating with public audiences.


image: Setting the Record Straight

Setting the Record Straight

By | October 1, 2014

Scientists are taking to social media to challenge weak research, share replication attempts in real time, and counteract hype. Will this online discourse enrich the scientific process?


image: Epigenetics of Trained Innate Immunity

Epigenetics of Trained Innate Immunity

By | September 25, 2014

Documenting the epigenetic landscape of human innate immune cells reveals pathways essential for training macrophages.


The ALS Association has raised more than $100 million in donations through a charity campaign that went viral. How should that money be spent?

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | September 1, 2014

An Indomitable Beast, What If?, Superintelligence, and Dataclysm


image: How Long Is Too Long?

How Long Is Too Long?

By | August 27, 2014

Readers discuss the varied amounts of time they’ve waited for journals to respond to or act on their concerns regarding published papers.


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