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image: Gender-based Citation Disparities

Gender-based Citation Disparities

By | December 12, 2013

An analysis reveals that papers with women as key authors are cited less often than those with men as key authors.

2 Comments

image: Tweet Talk

Tweet Talk

By | December 11, 2013

A new analysis finds is no link between a researcher’s citations and Twitter mentions of her scientific research.

1 Comment

image: Male and Female Brains Wired Differently

Male and Female Brains Wired Differently

By | December 4, 2013

The brains of men contain stronger front-to-rear connections while those of women are better connected from left to right.

7 Comments

image: Breast Milk Programs Memory Skills

Breast Milk Programs Memory Skills

By | December 1, 2013

Mouse mothers can improve their pups’ memories by altering levels of immune chemicals in their milk.

0 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | December 1, 2013

Tigers Forever, High Moon Over the Amazon, Earth from Space, and Medicine's Michelangelo

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image: Herring Impaired

Herring Impaired

By | December 1, 2013

Changing ion channel densities allows fish to tune their hearing to male reproductive calls during breeding periods. 

0 Comments

image: Karmella Haynes - Artist

Karmella Haynes - Artist

By | December 1, 2013

December 2013's Scientist to Watch is also an accomplished painter.

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image: Weathering the Storm

Weathering the Storm

By | December 1, 2013

How to prepare your lab for natural disasters and cope with unavoidable consequences

1 Comment

image: Top 10 Innovations 2013

Top 10 Innovations 2013

By | December 1, 2013

The Scientist’s annual competition uncovered a bonanza of interesting technologies that made their way onto the market and into labs this year.

1 Comment

image: Review: <em>The Origin of Species</em>

Review: The Origin of Species

By | November 22, 2013

The Howard Hughes Medical Institute this week released three short films to teach students about evolution and speciation.

4 Comments

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