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image: Cell Change Up

Cell Change Up

By | February 9, 2012

Imaging cell cytoskeletons during early embryonic development leads researchers to uncover a new regulator of cell shape

3 Comments

image: Cancer’s First Step

Cancer’s First Step

By | February 8, 2012

A single mutant cell breaks free of its neighbors in the early stages of cancer development.

7 Comments

image: Brain Proteins May Be Key to Aging

Brain Proteins May Be Key to Aging

By | February 8, 2012

Deterioration of long-lived proteins on the surface of neuronal nuclei in the brain could lead to age-related defects in nervous function.

0 Comments

image: Opinion: No Objections to Nano?

Opinion: No Objections to Nano?

By | February 3, 2012

While biotechnology has met with mixed public reactions, to date nanotechnology seems to invoke much less public concern.

42 Comments

image: Multitude of Misconducts

Multitude of Misconducts

By | February 2, 2012

A database manager stole NIH grant funds, falsified data, and lied about it.

9 Comments

image: Sex, Deconstructed

Sex, Deconstructed

By | February 2, 2012

Hormones in the brain control sex-specific behaviors by activating individual genetic programs.

3 Comments

image: RNA Chases Its Tail

RNA Chases Its Tail

By | February 2, 2012

New research suggests that circular RNA transcripts are not as rare as previously thought.

0 Comments

image: Give Me a Hug

Give Me a Hug

By | February 1, 2012

Editor's choice in cell biology

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Pathological Altruism</em>

Book Excerpt from Pathological Altruism

By | February 1, 2012

In Chapter 1, editors Barbara Oakley, Ariel Knafo, and Michael McGrath introduce the concept of well-intentioned behaviors that go awry.

0 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | February 1, 2012

Neurogastronomy, Why Calories Count, The Kitchen as Laboratory, Fear of Food

1 Comment

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