The Scientist

» social media and cell & molecular biology

Most Recent

image: TS Picks: December 14, 2015

TS Picks: December 14, 2015

By | December 14, 2015

New PhDs boost economy; Dutch universities strike open-access deal with Elsevier; #scibucketlist

0 Comments

image: Carry-On Luggage

Carry-On Luggage

By | December 1, 2015

Without a vacuole, cell-cycle progression stalls out in yeast cells.

0 Comments

image: Getting Back in Shape

Getting Back in Shape

By | December 1, 2015

Contrary to years of research suggesting otherwise, most aggregated proteins regain their shape and functionality following heat shock.

0 Comments

image: Gia Voeltz: Cellular Cartographer

Gia Voeltz: Cellular Cartographer

By | December 1, 2015

Associate Professor, Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, University of Colorado, Boulder. Age: 43

0 Comments

image: Modern Rehab

Modern Rehab

By | December 1, 2015

See the soldier whose recovery from a debilitating muscle injury was greatly aided by a cellular therapy plus physical therapy.

0 Comments

image: Cellular Rehab

Cellular Rehab

By | December 1, 2015

Physical therapy and exercise are critical to the success of cell therapies approaching the clinic.

0 Comments

image: BRCA1 Linked to Alzheimer’s

BRCA1 Linked to Alzheimer’s

By | November 30, 2015

The cancer-related protein BRCA1 is important for learning and memory in mice and is depleted in the brains of Alzheimer’s patients, according to a study.

0 Comments

image: Cortical Census

Cortical Census

By | November 26, 2015

Scientists document the characteristics and connections of mouse neocortical neurons to establish the most detailed microcircuit map to date.

1 Comment

image: Wiping Out Gut Bugs Stops Obesity

Wiping Out Gut Bugs Stops Obesity

By | November 16, 2015

In mice lacking intestinal microbiota, white fat turns brown and obesity is prevented.

2 Comments

image: Another Telomere-Regulating Enzyme Found

Another Telomere-Regulating Enzyme Found

By | November 12, 2015

Researchers identify a novel protein that helps maintain the length of chromosome-capping telomeres. 

1 Comment

Popular Now

  1. Running on Empty
    Features Running on Empty

    Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

  2. Authors Peeved by APA’s Article Takedown Pilot
  3. Athletes’ Microbiomes Differ from Nonathletes
  4. Was a Drop in CRISPR Firms’ Stock Warranted?
AAAS