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image: Sensing Calories Without Taste

Sensing Calories Without Taste

By | April 22, 2013

Rodents and fruit flies appear to be able to sense nutrients even when they can’t taste the food they’re eating. Now, researchers are trying to figure out how.


image: Week in Review: April 8-12

Week in Review: April 8-12

By | April 12, 2013

Hot topics from the AACR meeting; the ongoing debate about pesticides’ effects on bees; a treasure trove of baby dinos; conservation on social media


image: Opinion: Does Social Media “Like” Conservation?

Opinion: Does Social Media “Like” Conservation?

By , , and | April 8, 2013

Environmental issues that resonate on an immediate, emotional level seem to play better on sites like Facebook than do longer-term, but no less serious problems.


image: Cancer Growth Curtailed

Cancer Growth Curtailed

By | April 4, 2013

Researchers develop two small molecules that slow the growth of human cancer cells.


image: Branching Out

Branching Out

By | April 1, 2013

Satellites of the Golgi apparatus generate the microtubules used to grow outer dendrite branches in Drosophila neurons.


image: Mighty Modifications

Mighty Modifications

By | April 1, 2013

Histone acetylation levels keep intracellular pH in check.


image: Gov’t Science and the Media

Gov’t Science and the Media

By | March 15, 2013

Federal research agencies, such as the NIH, EPA, and NSF, are improving communication between their scientists and journalists, but most can do better.

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image: Bee Venom for HIV Prevention

Bee Venom for HIV Prevention

By | March 12, 2013

Nanoparticles coated with a toxin found in bee venom can destroy HIV while leaving surrounding cells intact.


image: Prion-like Proteins Cause Disease

Prion-like Proteins Cause Disease

By | March 3, 2013

Normal proteins with regions resembling disease-causing prions are responsible for an inherited disorder that affects the brain, muscle, and bone.


image: Antibiotic Bouncer

Antibiotic Bouncer

By | March 1, 2013

Contrary to previous assumptions that macrolide antibiotics completely block the exit tunnel of ribosomes, new evidence shows that some peptides are allowed to pass.


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