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The ALS Association has raised more than $100 million in donations through a charity campaign that went viral. How should that money be spent?

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | September 1, 2014

An Indomitable Beast, What If?, Superintelligence, and Dataclysm

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image: Precisely Placed

Precisely Placed

By | September 1, 2014

Vein patterns in the wings of developing fruit flies never vary by more than the width of a single cell.

3 Comments

image: How Long Is Too Long?

How Long Is Too Long?

By | August 27, 2014

Readers discuss the varied amounts of time they’ve waited for journals to respond to or act on their concerns regarding published papers.

2 Comments

image: Social Data for Ebola Surveillance

Social Data for Ebola Surveillance

By | August 26, 2014

Algorithms that map social media posts and mobile phone data can help researchers track epidemics.

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image: PubPeer Threatened with Legal Action

PubPeer Threatened with Legal Action

By | August 19, 2014

The moderators of the post-publication peer review forum say they could be facing their first legal case.

2 Comments

image: Crayfish Blood Cells Make New Neurons

Crayfish Blood Cells Make New Neurons

By | August 13, 2014

Hemocytes can form neurons in adult crayfish, a study shows.

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image: Introducing the “K Index”

Introducing the “K Index”

By | July 30, 2014

The Kardashian Index reflects how a scientist’s social media presence stacks up against her citation record.

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image: Arrested Development Makes for Long-Lived Worms

Arrested Development Makes for Long-Lived Worms

By | June 23, 2014

Starvation suspends cellular activity in C. elegans larvae and extends their lifespan. 

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image: Autism-Hormone Link Found

Autism-Hormone Link Found

By | June 4, 2014

A study documents boys with autism who were exposed to elevated levels of testosterone, cortisol, and other hormones in utero.

1 Comment

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