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image: Week in Review, July 8–12

Week in Review, July 8–12

By | July 12, 2013

Editor accused of fraud leaves post; the good and the bad of gut microbiota; bacterial gene shuffle; legal restrictions hamper illicit drug research; antibodies and autism

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image: Gut Microbes Exacerbate HIV?

Gut Microbes Exacerbate HIV?

By | July 10, 2013

Particular microbes in the colons of HIV patients may worsen disease progression.

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image: Gut Microbes Treat Illness

Gut Microbes Treat Illness

By | July 10, 2013

Oral administration of a cocktail of bacteria derived from the human gut reduces colitis and allergy-invoked diarrhea in mice.

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image: Opinion: Research, Restricted

Opinion: Research, Restricted

By | July 8, 2013

Are the international drug laws the worst impediment to scientific inquiry since the Catholic Church banned the telescope?

4 Comments

image: Week in Review, July 1–5

Week in Review, July 1–5

By | July 5, 2013

Fraudulent journal editor?; fat cells detect temp, generate heat; the importance of social media in science communication; functional livers from iPSCs; antibiotics damage mitochondria

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image: The Downside of Antibiotics?

The Downside of Antibiotics?

By | July 3, 2013

Bacteria-killing antibiotics might also damage a person’s tissues.

3 Comments

image: Opinion: Tweeting to the Top

Opinion: Tweeting to the Top

By | July 2, 2013

The lines between scholarly and traditional forms of popular communication are fading, and scientists need to take advantage.

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image: Worried Sick

Worried Sick

By | July 1, 2013

Expectations can make you ill. Fear can make you fragile. Understanding the nocebo effect may help prevent this painful phenomenon.

3 Comments

image: Platelets Help Tackle Bacteria

Platelets Help Tackle Bacteria

By | June 16, 2013

The cell fragments play a role in the body’s first line of defense against bacterial infection, helping white blood cells grab blood-borne bacteria in the liver.

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image: Genes Get in Your Eye

Genes Get in Your Eye

By | June 12, 2013

Directed evolution of a gene therapy virus vector improves its penetration into the retina.

5 Comments

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