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image: Farmer Fungi

Farmer Fungi

By | January 1, 2014

Researchers uncover an unprecedented relationship between morels and bacteria. But can it be called agriculture?

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Speaking of Science

By | January 1, 2014

January 2014's selection of notable quotes

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image: tenOever on microRNA and Vaccines

tenOever on microRNA and Vaccines

By | January 1, 2014

January 2014 Scientist to Watch Benjamin tenOever discusses his research.

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Contributors

By | January 1, 2014

Meet some of the people featured in the January 2014 issue of The Scientist.

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image: New Species Abound

New Species Abound

By | December 26, 2013

A look at 2013’s noteworthy new species

5 Comments

image: Top Genomes of 2013

Top Genomes of 2013

By | December 26, 2013

What researchers learned as they dug through the most highly cited genomes published this year

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On The Origin of Flowers

By | December 19, 2013

The genome of Amborella trichopoda—the sister species of all flowering plants—provides clues about this group’s rise to power.

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image: The Mating Habits of Early Hominins

The Mating Habits of Early Hominins

By | December 18, 2013

A newly sequenced Neanderthal genome provides insight into the sex lives of human ancestors.

3 Comments

image: Herding Cats

Herding Cats

By | December 17, 2013

Examination of bones found in a Chinese village suggests that domesticated felines lived side-by-side with humans 5,300 years ago.

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image: Gut Bacteria Vary with Diet

Gut Bacteria Vary with Diet

By | December 13, 2013

Extreme diets can alter the microbial makeup of the human GI tract, and change the behavior of those bacteria.

1 Comment

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