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image: Herding Cats

Herding Cats

By | December 17, 2013

Examination of bones found in a Chinese village suggests that domesticated felines lived side-by-side with humans 5,300 years ago.

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image: Dogs, Dust Microbes, and Allergies

Dogs, Dust Microbes, and Allergies

By | December 16, 2013

Dust-borne bacteria from houses with dogs can prevent allergies in mice by changing their gut microbes.

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image: Cancer and Immune Cells Merge

Cancer and Immune Cells Merge

By | December 16, 2013

Mouse colon cancer cells can fuse with macrophages, leading to changes in tumor growth.

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image: How Bacteria Evade the Immune System

How Bacteria Evade the Immune System

By | December 12, 2013

Escherichia coli can quickly evolve to resist engulfment by macrophages, scientists have found.

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image: A New Basal Animal

A New Basal Animal

By | December 12, 2013

Comb jellies take their place on the oldest branch of the animal family tree.  

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image: Tweet Talk

Tweet Talk

By | December 11, 2013

A new analysis finds is no link between a researcher’s citations and Twitter mentions of her scientific research.

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image: A Cancer Culprit in Autoimmunity

A Cancer Culprit in Autoimmunity

By | December 5, 2013

Scientists discover that cancer can drive the autoimmune disorder scleroderma.

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image: Wolfish Social Skills

Wolfish Social Skills

By | December 4, 2013

According to a new study, wolves can learn from humans.

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image: Bipedal Beginnings

Bipedal Beginnings

By | December 4, 2013

Re-examination of a thigh bone from one of the earliest putative hominins could impact scientists’ understanding of the origins of human bipedalism, a study suggests.

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image: Breast Milk Programs Memory Skills

Breast Milk Programs Memory Skills

By | December 1, 2013

Mouse mothers can improve their pups’ memories by altering levels of immune chemicals in their milk.

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