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The Scientist

» social media and evolution

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | July 1, 2012

July 2012's selection of notable quotes

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image: The First Australopithecus, 1925

The First Australopithecus, 1925

By | July 1, 2012

The discovery of the 2.5-million-year-old Taung Child skull marked a turning point in the study of human brain evolution.

2 Comments

image: Promotional Science Video Criticized

Promotional Science Video Criticized

By | June 25, 2012

A video from the European Commission, aimed at encouraging women to enter STEM fields, is criticized for its use of clichés, including high heels and short skirts.

9 Comments

image: Five Mutations Make H5N1 Airborne

Five Mutations Make H5N1 Airborne

By | June 21, 2012

The second of the two controversial bird flu papers is published in Science, revealing that just five mutations can render the virus transmissible between ferrets.

3 Comments

image: @Pharma Branching Out

@Pharma Branching Out

By | June 11, 2012

More than half of pharmaceutical companies on Twitter use more than one handle.

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image: Discovering Phasmids

Discovering Phasmids

By | June 9, 2012

Shortly after a rat infested supply ship ran around in Lord Howe Island off the east coast of Australia in 1918, the newly introduced mammals wiped out the island's phasmids—stick insects the size of a human hand. 

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image: Finding Phasmids

Finding Phasmids

By | June 1, 2012

Researchers rediscover a giant insect, thought to have gone extinct a century ago, and plan to reintroduce it to its native island off the coast of Australia.

6 Comments

image: Hacking the Genome

Hacking the Genome

By | June 1, 2012

In pondering genome structure and function, evolutionary geneticist Laurence Hurst has arrived at some unanticipated conclusions about how natural selection has molded our DNA.

6 Comments

image: Revenge of the Weeds

Revenge of the Weeds

By | May 20, 2012

Plant pests are evolving to outsmart common herbicides, costing farmers crops and money.

33 Comments

image: Live Slow, Die Old

Live Slow, Die Old

By | May 17, 2012

Ancient bacteria living in deep-sea sediments are alive—but with metabolisms so slow that it’s hard to tell.

13 Comments

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