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image: Prominent Geneticist Dies

Prominent Geneticist Dies

By | November 5, 2013

Leonard Herzenberg, who helped to develop the first fluorescence-activated cell sorter, has passed away at age 81.

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image: Decoding Breast Cancer Drug Resistance

Decoding Breast Cancer Drug Resistance

By | November 3, 2013

Common mutations in metastasized breast tumors suggest how the cancer can develop resistance to frontline drugs.

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image: Week in Review: October 28–November 1

Week in Review: October 28–November 1

By | November 1, 2013

Neuronal DNA variation; male hormone sparks mosquito egg production; pulvinar neurons aid primate snake detection; spiders and cryptic female choice

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image: Bad Blood

Bad Blood

By | November 1, 2013

A rare bleeding disorder leads scientists to uncover an unusual blood component that might be common to us all.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Brave Genius</em>

Book Excerpt from Brave Genius

By | November 1, 2013

In Chapter 20, “On the Same Path,” author Sean Carroll describes the initial meeting between Nobel Laureates Jacques Monod and Albert Camus.

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image: Chance and Necessity

Chance and Necessity

By | November 1, 2013

War and justice brought together two of the greatest minds of the 20th century, a scientist and a writer.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | November 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the November 2013 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Exploring the Neuron Forest

Exploring the Neuron Forest

By | November 1, 2013

Innovations in imaging techniques and genetic sequencing take neuroscience to a new level.

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image: How, If, and Why Species Form

How, If, and Why Species Form

By , , and | November 1, 2013

Biologists have struggled for centuries to properly define what constitutes a “species.” They may have been asking the wrong question—many smaller organisms might not form species at all.

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image: The Ultimate Wingman

The Ultimate Wingman

By | November 1, 2013

Differential gene expression between dominant and subordinate male turkeys could help evolutionary biologists deconstruct the roots of sexual dimorphism.

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