The Scientist

» social media

Most Recent

image: Facebook CEO’s Donation a Boon to Basic Science

Facebook CEO’s Donation a Boon to Basic Science

By | September 25, 2016

But can $3 billion dollars meet the lofty goals of the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative?

1 Comment

image: Helping Scientists Spread Their Research

Helping Scientists Spread Their Research

By | August 1, 2016

A platform called Kudos helps users disseminate—and explain—their publications for free.

0 Comments

image: Fieldwork Bloopers

Fieldwork Bloopers

By | June 21, 2016

Scenes from illustrator Jim Jourdane’s Fieldwork Fail: The Messy Side of Science

0 Comments

image: Illustrating #FieldworkFails

Illustrating #FieldworkFails

By | June 21, 2016

An artist aims to publish a collection of stories of science gone awry.

1 Comment

image: TS Picks: December 14, 2015

TS Picks: December 14, 2015

By | December 14, 2015

New PhDs boost economy; Dutch universities strike open-access deal with Elsevier; #scibucketlist

0 Comments

image: Field Bloopers

Field Bloopers

By | August 3, 2015

Scientists air their most embarrassing fieldwork flubs on Twitter.

0 Comments

image: Batch Effect Behind Species-Specific Results?

Batch Effect Behind Species-Specific Results?

By | May 19, 2015

Reanalysis of Mouse ENCODE data suggests mouse and human genes are expressed in tissue-specific, rather than species-specific, patterns. 

1 Comment

image: HIV in the Internet Age

HIV in the Internet Age

By | May 1, 2015

Social networking sites may facilitate the spread of sexually transmitted disease, but these sites also serve as effective education and prevention tools.

0 Comments

image: Lab Bloopers Galore

Lab Bloopers Galore

By | April 24, 2015

Readers reveal research mishaps

1 Comment

image: Lab Bloopers

Lab Bloopers

By | April 22, 2015

Reddit users share the worst mishaps they’ve witnessed while working in the lab.

4 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Monsanto Buys Rights to CRISPR
    The Nutshell Monsanto Buys Rights to CRISPR

    The US agribusiness secures a global, nonexclusive licensing agreement from the Broad Institute to use the gene-editing technology for agricultural applications.

  2. How Plants Evolved Different Ways to Make Caffeine
  3. Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobelists
    The Nutshell Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobelists

    According to citation statistics, researchers behind programmed cell death pathways and CRISPR/Cas9 are among those in line for Nobel Prizes this year.

  4. ESP on Trial
    Foundations ESP on Trial

    In the 1930s, parapsychologist Joseph Banks Rhine aimed to use scientific methods to confirm the existence of extrasensory perception, but faced criticisms of dubious analyses and irreproducible results.

RayBiotech