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image: Transparency Now

Transparency Now

By | May 1, 2016

Science is messy. So lay it out, warts and all.

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image: Aneuploid Responses

Aneuploid Responses

By | May 1, 2016

A recent exchange of papers is divided over the evidence for compensatory gene expression among wild strains of aneuploid yeast.


image: Contributors


By and | May 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the May 2016 issue of The Scientist.


image: Meiotic Mysteries

Meiotic Mysteries

By | May 1, 2016

Understanding why so many human oocytes contain the wrong number of chromosomes


image: Picturing Inheritance, 1916

Picturing Inheritance, 1916

By | May 1, 2016

This year marks the centennial of Calvin Bridges’s description of nondisjunction as proof that chromosomes are vehicles for inheritance.

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image: A Scrambled Mess

A Scrambled Mess

By | May 1, 2016

Why do so many human eggs have the wrong number of chromosomes?


image: AACR Q&A: Angelika Amon

AACR Q&A: Angelika Amon

By | April 19, 2016

The aneuploidy expert shares what she has learned at the American Association for Cancer Research annual meeting.


image: A Benefit of Failed Pregnancy?

A Benefit of Failed Pregnancy?

By | April 9, 2015

Scientists find a common genetic variant in mothers that decreases the chance of successful pregnancy.


image: New DNA-based Prenatal Test

New DNA-based Prenatal Test

By | March 1, 2013

Another company has launched a non-invasive DNA screen for genetic disorders in unborn babies, adding to the competition in an emerging market.


image: Year of the Fetus

Year of the Fetus

By | December 18, 2012

2012 saw the birth of a handful of non-invasive genetic prenatal tests, but the young industry faces growing pains as legal and ethical questions loom. 


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