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image: “Maleness” Gene Found in Malaria Mosquito

“Maleness” Gene Found in Malaria Mosquito

By | June 30, 2016

Researchers have identified the male-determining gene in the malaria mosquito, whose expression in females is lethal.

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image: Opinion: Target the Vector

Opinion: Target the Vector

By | June 28, 2016

Officials’ increased emphasis on mosquito control could benefit public health efforts beyond the ongoing Zika outbreak. 

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Ancient DNA research suggests that there were two independent agricultural revolutions more than 10,000 years ago.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Wondrous Truths</em>

Book Excerpt from Wondrous Truths

By | June 1, 2016

In Chapter 2 author J.D. Trout highlights the dividing line between truth and scientific “fact.”

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image: Hot Off the Presses

Hot Off the Presses

By | June 1, 2016

Beyond Biocentrism, The Sting of the Wild, The Birth of Anthropocene, and Ordinarily Well

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | June 1, 2016

14-day-old embryos, prioritizing biodiversity, and more

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image: Start Making Sense

Start Making Sense

By | June 1, 2016

Scientific progress is only achieved when humans' innate sense of understanding is validated by objective reality.

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image: Chloroquine Protects Against Zika In Vitro

Chloroquine Protects Against Zika In Vitro

By | May 12, 2016

The antimalarial drug reduces the number of infected Vero and human brain microvascular endothelial cells—among other cell types—in culture, researchers report in a preprint.

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image: Another Andrew Wakefield Movie in the Works

Another Andrew Wakefield Movie in the Works

By | May 4, 2016

This one will be largely based on the discredited anti-vaccine researcher’s 2010 book.

10 Comments

image: Most Gut Microbes Can Be Cultured

Most Gut Microbes Can Be Cultured

By | May 4, 2016

Contrary to the popular thought that many species are “unculturable,” the majority of bacteria known to populate the human gut can be grown in the lab, scientists show.

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