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image: Cells Follow Stiffness Gradients by Playing Tug-of-War

Cells Follow Stiffness Gradients by Playing Tug-of-War

By | December 1, 2016

Cells with the best traction on a substrate pull their neighbors toward firmer ground.

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image: Doors and Pores

Doors and Pores

By | December 1, 2016

The awesome architecture of the gateways to the nucleus

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In 1992, advancements in microscopy zoomed in on the precise architecture of the complex, including unforeseen structural repetition in two halves of the ring.

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A family’s collection of antique microscope slides became a trove of genetic information about the eradicated European malaria pathogen.

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image: Pushing Boundaries

Pushing Boundaries

By | December 1, 2016

Applying physics, chemistry, and cell biology, Satyajit Mayor seeks to understand how cell membranes work.

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image: Using Raman Spectroscopy to Identify Cell Types

Using Raman Spectroscopy to Identify Cell Types

By | December 1, 2016

Improvements in instruments and statistical tools allow the capture and analysis of large data sets.

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image: Video: Cells, Skin Deep

Video: Cells, Skin Deep

By | December 1, 2016

Profilee Satyajit Mayor discusses his explorations of cell membranes, which are helping to update the classical fluid mosaic model of dynamic cellular boundaries.

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image: Vlad Denic on Exploring New Fields and Failing Successfully

Vlad Denic on Exploring New Fields and Failing Successfully

By | December 1, 2016

The Harvard professor is pursuing fundamental questions about autophagy, protein homeostasis, and other cellular processes, and he’s always on the lookout for his next new topic.

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image: Infographic: How to Build a Synthetic Sensor

Infographic: How to Build a Synthetic Sensor

By | December 1, 2016

Scientists designed a genetic sensor-and-readout system, based on detecting a transcription factor, that performs a custom cellular activity.

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image: Nuclear Pores Come into Sharper Focus

Nuclear Pores Come into Sharper Focus

By and | December 1, 2016

Solving a long-standing structural puzzle will open the door to understanding one of the cell’s most enigmatic machines.

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