The Scientist

» malaria and developmental biology

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image: The Prescient Placenta

The Prescient Placenta

By | August 1, 2015

The maternal-fetal interface plays important roles in the health of both mother and baby, even after birth.

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image: EMA Green Lights Malaria Vax

EMA Green Lights Malaria Vax

By | July 27, 2015

The European Medicines Agency endorses the first-ever malaria vaccine for use in children 6 weeks to 17 months old.


image: Outbreak Observatory

Outbreak Observatory

By | July 1, 2015

Increasingly precise remote-sensing data are helping researchers monitor and predict cases of infectious disease.

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image: Sperm From Ovaries

Sperm From Ovaries

By | June 11, 2015

With the deletion of a single gene, female Japanese rice fish can produce sperm. 

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image: Dino Snouts from Chicken Beaks

Dino Snouts from Chicken Beaks

By | May 13, 2015

Researchers tweak gene expression in chicken embryos that may have been crucial to the evolutionary transition from dinosaur noses to bird bills.


image: Viral Protector

Viral Protector

By | April 21, 2015

A retrovirus embedded in the human genome may help protect embryos from other viruses, and influence fetal development.

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image: Contributors


By | April 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2015 issue of The Scientist.


image: From Many, One

From Many, One

By | April 1, 2015

Diverse mammals, including humans, have been found to carry distinct genomes in their cells. What does such genetic chimerism mean for health and disease?


image: Short, Strong Signals

Short, Strong Signals

By | March 25, 2015

Methylation increases both the activity and instability of the signaling protein Notch.


image: Antibiotic Boosts Parasitic Infection

Antibiotic Boosts Parasitic Infection

By | January 22, 2015

Mosquitoes that consume penicillin and streptomycin-laced blood pick up malaria more easily.


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