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image: Image of the Day: Saltwater Survivors

Image of the Day: Saltwater Survivors

By | January 9, 2017

When road deicing salt enters freshwater ecosystems, prey species such as Daphnia pulex can rapidly evolve tolerance to the contaminant, buffering their local food webs from the impacts of salination.

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The small lizards adapted to unique niches among dozens of isles.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | January 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the January 2017 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Gene Drives and Other Controversies

Gene Drives and Other Controversies

By | January 1, 2017

Aedes and Anopheles control; three-parent babies; the PhD glut

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image: Historical Hunts

Historical Hunts

By | January 1, 2017

See images from a century of fur trapping and hunting in the Amazon basin.

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Researchers use a century of trade records to uncover differences in the resilience of terrestrial and aquatic species.

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image: Using Gene Drives to Limit the Spread of Malaria

Using Gene Drives to Limit the Spread of Malaria

By | January 1, 2017

Introducing genetic changes into mosquito populations could be key to effective malaria control.

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image: Infographic: Using Gene Drive to Control Malaria

Infographic: Using Gene Drive to Control Malaria

By | January 1, 2017

For years, researchers have looked to genetically modify mosquitoes to prevent the spread of malaria. Now they have a promising strategy.

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image: Cheetah Range Drops 90 Percent

Cheetah Range Drops 90 Percent

By | December 27, 2016

Estimating only 7,100 individuals remaining, researchers urge a reclassification of the species from vulnerable to endangered.

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image: UN Rejects Calls for Moratorium on Gene Drive Research

UN Rejects Calls for Moratorium on Gene Drive Research

By | December 23, 2016

Activists claim the technology is too risky, but scientists advise the United Nations to continue to support gene drive research.

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