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image: Classic Example of Symbiosis Revised

Classic Example of Symbiosis Revised

By | July 25, 2016

The partnering of an alga and a fungus to make lichen may be only two-thirds of the equation.

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image: Man and Bird Chat While Honey Hunting

Man and Bird Chat While Honey Hunting

By | July 25, 2016

A study suggests that humans and avians in sub-Saharan Africa communicate to find and mutually benefit from the sweet booty.

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More than half of the world’s land may have passed the threshold that threatens long-term sustainable development, researchers report.

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image: Hot Off the Presses

Hot Off the Presses

By | July 1, 2016

The Scientist reviews Serendipity, Complexity, The Human Superorgasism, and Love and Ruin

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image: Peter Tyack: Marine Mammal Communications

Peter Tyack: Marine Mammal Communications

By | July 1, 2016

The University of St. Andrews behavioral ecologist studies the social structures and behaviors of whales and dolphins, recording and analyzing their acoustic communications.

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image: Submerged Pigs Inform Forensics

Submerged Pigs Inform Forensics

By | July 1, 2016

Watching the decomposition of pig carcasses anchored to the seafloor is helping forensic researchers understand what to expect of human remains dumped in the ocean.

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image: Well-Brined Pork

Well-Brined Pork

By | July 1, 2016

Watch what happens when marine organisms have their way with a sunken pig carcass.

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Rather than providing complete protection, the long-awaited vaccine merely delays infection by a few years, scientists show.

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image: “Maleness” Gene Found in Malaria Mosquito

“Maleness” Gene Found in Malaria Mosquito

By | June 30, 2016

Researchers have identified the male-determining gene in the malaria mosquito, whose expression in females is lethal.

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image: Opinion: Target the Vector

Opinion: Target the Vector

By | June 28, 2016

Officials’ increased emphasis on mosquito control could benefit public health efforts beyond the ongoing Zika outbreak. 

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