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image: Old-School Fish Guides

Old-School Fish Guides

By | March 18, 2014

Experienced fish may be critical for keeping migrating populations on track, a study finds.


image: Ancient Moss Reincarnated

Ancient Moss Reincarnated

By | March 18, 2014

Antarctic moss beds that have been frozen for more than 1,500 years yield plants that can be brought back to life in the lab.

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image: Northern Exposure

Northern Exposure

By | March 1, 2014

Researchers are using snowdrifts to artificially warm Arctic tundra during winter and finding that more carbon is released from the soil than plants can soak up from the atmosphere.


image: Week in Review: January 20–24

Week in Review: January 20–24

By | January 24, 2014

Mistimed sleep disrupts human transcriptome; canine tumor genome; de novo Drosophila genes; UVA light lowers blood pressure; aquatic microfauna fight frog-killing fungus


image: New Suspect in Bee Colony Collapse

New Suspect in Bee Colony Collapse

By | January 21, 2014

A virus that causes blight in plants may contribute the catastrophic decline of honeybee colonies.


image: Older Trees Grow Faster

Older Trees Grow Faster

By | January 20, 2014

Mature trees soak up more CO2 than younger ones, a study shows, overturning a bit of botanical dogma.


image: Fewer Female Snail Penises

Fewer Female Snail Penises

By | January 14, 2014

Researchers are now spotting fewer cases of imposex—in which female sea snails develop male sexual organs—as a result of a chemical ban instituted in 2008.


image: Large Carnivores Under Siege

Large Carnivores Under Siege

By | January 13, 2014

As populations of top predators decline in ecosystems the world over, researchers chart the widespread effects.


image: Settlement Signal

Settlement Signal

By | January 9, 2014

A marine bacterium generates contractile structures that are essential for the metamorphosis of a tubeworm.


image: Unhealthy Chemicals Linked to Fracking

Unhealthy Chemicals Linked to Fracking

By | December 17, 2013

Water samples collected from natural gas extraction sites in Colorado contain hormone-disrupting chemicals linked to birth defects, infertility, and cancer.

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