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image: On the Other Hand

On the Other Hand

By | September 1, 2014

Handedness, a conspicuous but enigmatic human trait, may be shared by other animals. What does it mean for evolution and brain function?

6 Comments

image: Monkey See, Monkey Don’t

Monkey See, Monkey Don’t

By | June 30, 2014

Species in a tightly knit genus of Old World primates have evolved tell-tale facial characteristics to prevent hybridization, a study shows.

0 Comments

image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Drunken Monkey</em>

Book Excerpt from The Drunken Monkey

By | June 1, 2014

In Chapter 3, "On the Inebriation of Elephants," author Robert Dudley considers whether tales of tipsy pachyderms and bombed baboons have any basis in scientific truth.

1 Comment

image: Drunks and Monkeys

Drunks and Monkeys

By | June 1, 2014

Understanding our primate ancestors’ relationship with alcohol can inform its use by modern humans.  

5 Comments

image: The Surprising Evolution of Sex Determination

The Surprising Evolution of Sex Determination

By | April 23, 2014

A detailed analysis of sex chromosomes finds unexpected evolution of functional Y chromosome genes across species.

6 Comments

image: Sloppy Notes Led to Goodall Plagiarism

Sloppy Notes Led to Goodall Plagiarism

By | April 1, 2014

Jane Goodall’s latest book was revised to eliminate plagiarism, which she blames on chaotic note-taking.  

0 Comments

image: More Monkeys With Edited Genomes

More Monkeys With Edited Genomes

By | February 14, 2014

Researchers use the TALEN genome-editing technique to generate a primate model of Rett syndrome.  

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image: First CRISPR-Tinkered Primates Born

First CRISPR-Tinkered Primates Born

By | February 3, 2014

Twin macaques are the first primates born whose genomes were edited using CRISPR technology.

0 Comments

image: Bipedal Beginnings

Bipedal Beginnings

By | December 4, 2013

Re-examination of a thigh bone from one of the earliest putative hominins could impact scientists’ understanding of the origins of human bipedalism, a study suggests.

0 Comments

image: A Lot Like Humans

A Lot Like Humans

By | October 15, 2013

Scientists find that bonobos can form friendships and show concern for others.

2 Comments

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