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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | February 1, 2015

Touch, The Altruistic Brain, Is Shame Necessary?, and Future Arctic

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image: Stubbornly Persistent

Stubbornly Persistent

By | February 1, 2015

Microorganisms continually challenge our assumptions of what life can achieve.

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image: Time-Lapse on the Cheap

Time-Lapse on the Cheap

By | February 1, 2015

A PhD student jury-rigs a microscopy system for high-throughput cell motility assays.

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image: Thanks for the Memories

Thanks for the Memories

By | February 1, 2015

B and T cells may be the memory masters of the immune system, but research reveals that other cells can be primed by pathogens, too.

1 Comment

image: Viral Virtuosos

Viral Virtuosos

By | February 1, 2015

New understanding of noncoding RNAs may solve a long-standing puzzle about how viruses orchestrate lifelong infections.  

3 Comments

image: Brain Cells Behind Overeating

Brain Cells Behind Overeating

By | January 29, 2015

Scientists have defined mouse neurons responsible for excessive food consumption at an unprecedented level of detail. 

1 Comment

image: Filming the Nematode Brain

Filming the Nematode Brain

By | January 26, 2015

Researchers record the first whole-brain videos of an unrestrained animal, viewing neural activity as a roundworm moved freely around a Petri dish.

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image: Interferon Discoverer Dies

Interferon Discoverer Dies

By | January 26, 2015

Jean Lindemann, the virologist who helped figure out that interferons were responsible for anti-viral responses, has passed away at age 90.

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image: Oxytocin for Autism?

Oxytocin for Autism?

By | January 21, 2015

Scientists find that the hormone improves sociability in a mouse model of autism.

4 Comments

image: Zooming In

Zooming In

By | January 20, 2015

To improve the reach of optical microscopy, researchers are enlarging the biological features they wish to view.

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