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image: Mobile Microscopes

Mobile Microscopes

By | June 1, 2013

Turning cell phones into basic research tools can improve health care in the developing world.

5 Comments

image: There's an App for That

There's an App for That

By | June 1, 2013

See UCLA researchers Hongying Zhu and Aydogan Ozcan transform an ordinary cell phone into a mobile fluorescent microscope.

2 Comments

image: Best Places to Work Industry 2013

Best Places to Work Industry 2013

By | June 1, 2013

Our final survey of the life-science industry workplace highlights the companies—small and large, domestic and international—that are making their researchers feel valued and at home.

2 Comments

image: It Takes a Village

It Takes a Village

By | June 1, 2013

Scientists working in developing countries find that giving back to local communities enriches their own research.

3 Comments

image: BPA Dangers in Pregnancy?

BPA Dangers in Pregnancy?

By | May 28, 2013

Pregnant mice exposed to the chemical used in many plastics have offspring with behavioral abnormalities.

0 Comments

image: Stroke Patients Improve with Stem Cells

Stroke Patients Improve with Stem Cells

By | May 28, 2013

Long-term stroke patients involved in a small-scale clinical trial of a neural stem-cell therapy show signs of recovery.

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image: Distinct Neural Pathway for Itchiness

Distinct Neural Pathway for Itchiness

By | May 24, 2013

Scientists find the molecule that delivers itchiness signals to the brain via a dedicated, and previously unknown, neural pathway.  

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image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | May 23, 2013

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

1 Comment

image: Watching the Brain Remember

Watching the Brain Remember

By | May 16, 2013

For the first time, researchers visualize zebrafish memory retrieval in real time.

0 Comments

image: Clock Genes Linked to Depression

Clock Genes Linked to Depression

By | May 15, 2013

Patients with major depressive disorder appear to have malfunctioning circadian rhythms, which could lead researchers to new avenues for treatment.

12 Comments

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