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The publicly available database found nearly a third of samples included mutations targeted by either approved drugs or therapies in clinical trials. 

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image: Genes’ Composition Guides More-Optimal Diets

Genes’ Composition Guides More-Optimal Diets

By | June 1, 2017

Fruit flies and mice grow better and eat less when the amino acid balance of their food reflects that coded by their exomes.

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image: Learning from Iceland’s Model for Genetic Research

Learning from Iceland’s Model for Genetic Research

By | June 1, 2017

The Scandinavian island’s unique combination of genetic homogeneity, genealogical tradition, and high participation in research make it a prime location for discovery and validation of drug targets.

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image: Microbiome Racer

Microbiome Racer

By | June 1, 2017

Genomicist Lauren Petersen wins a mountain bike race after she altered her own gut microbial communities.

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image: Pinpointing the Culprit

Pinpointing the Culprit

By | June 1, 2017

Identifying immune cell subsets with CyTOF

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image: Self-Experimentation Led to the Discovery of IgE

Self-Experimentation Led to the Discovery of IgE

By | June 1, 2017

In the 1960s, immunologists took matters into their own hands—and under their own skin—to characterize an immunoglobulin involved in allergies.

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image: Infographic: A Body Without Food

Infographic: A Body Without Food

By | June 1, 2017

Mounting evidence suggests that intermittent fasting causes significant changes to various organs and tissue types.

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image: Infographic: Cook Up an Exome-Based Diet

Infographic: Cook Up an Exome-Based Diet

By | June 1, 2017

See how scientists designed food with amino acid compositions based on protein-coding regions in the genomes of mice and fruit flies.

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image: Infographic: Immune Irritation in the Gut

Infographic: Immune Irritation in the Gut

By | June 1, 2017

A look at how gluten affects patients with celiac disease

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image: No Place to Hide

No Place to Hide

By | May 31, 2017

Environmental DNA is tracking down difficult-to-detect species, from rock snot in the U.S. to cave salamanders in Croatia.

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