The Scientist

» microscope, immunology and genetics & genomics

Most Recent

image: Royal Treatment

Royal Treatment

By | February 12, 2014

Scientists in the U.K. will sequence the genome of King Richard III.

0 Comments

image: Week in Review: February 3–7

Week in Review: February 3–7

By | February 7, 2014

Federal stem cell regulations vary; Salmonella exploit host immune system; microglia help maintain synaptic connections; prosthesis re-creates feeling of touch

0 Comments

image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By | February 6, 2014

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes

0 Comments

image: Immune Response Promotes Infection

Immune Response Promotes Infection

By | February 6, 2014

Salmonella enterica can exploit a standard immune response in mice to promote its own growth.

2 Comments

image: The Flight Size

The Flight Size

By | February 5, 2014

The metabolic intensity of powered flight seems to have caused some bird genomes to shrink.

1 Comment

image: First CRISPR-Tinkered Primates Born

First CRISPR-Tinkered Primates Born

By | February 3, 2014

Twin macaques are the first primates born whose genomes were edited using CRISPR technology.

0 Comments

image: Pruning Synapses Improves Brain Connections

Pruning Synapses Improves Brain Connections

By | February 2, 2014

Without microglia to pluck off unwanted synapses in early life, mouse brains develop with weaker connections, leading to altered social behavior.

2 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | February 1, 2014

Me, Myself, and Why, RedDevil 4, Neanderthal Man, and Science from Sight to Insight

0 Comments

image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | February 1, 2014

February 2014's selection of notable quotes

0 Comments

image: Week in Review: January 27–31

Week in Review: January 27–31

By | January 31, 2014

Stimulus-triggered pluripotency; antioxidants speed lung tumor growth; the importance of seminal vesicles; how a plant pathogen jumps hosts

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Running on Empty
    Features Running on Empty

    Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

  2. Athletes’ Microbiomes Differ from Nonathletes
  3. Mutation Linked to Longer Life Span in Men
  4. Gut Feeling
    Daily News Gut Feeling

    Sensory cells of the mouse intestine let the brain know if certain compounds are present by speaking directly to gut neurons via serotonin.

AAAS