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In Chapter 12, "The Opium Fields," author Marc Lewis recounts one night spent in the brain chemistry-bending grip of opium addiction.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | May 1, 2012

Masters of the Planet, Learning from the Octopus, Darwin’s Devices, and Psychology’s Ghosts

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Contributors

May 1, 2012

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2012 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Dopamine: Duality of Desire

Dopamine: Duality of Desire

By | May 1, 2012

Being an ex-drug-addict turned neuroscientist brings a unique insight into the physiological and phenomenological realities of addiction.

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Pure Pursuits

By | May 1, 2012

Techniques for simpler, cheaper, and better antibody purification

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image: Tumor Turnabout

Tumor Turnabout

By | May 1, 2012

A cytokine involved in suppressing the immune system may actually activate it to kill cancer cells.

4 Comments

image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | May 1, 2012

May 2012's selection of notable quotes

8 Comments

image: Anti-inflammatory Factors Fight Bugs

Anti-inflammatory Factors Fight Bugs

By | April 25, 2012

A combination of antibiotics and the body’s own defensive metabolites clears bacterial infections faster than antibiotics alone.

4 Comments

image: Opinion: Data to Knowledge to Action

Opinion: Data to Knowledge to Action

By | April 18, 2012

Introducing DELSA Global, a community initiative to connect experts, share data, and democratize science.

2 Comments

image: Scottish DNA Unexpectedly Diverse

Scottish DNA Unexpectedly Diverse

By | April 18, 2012

Geography might explain the treasure trove of genetic diversity among Scots.

2 Comments

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