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image: Wolf Species Are Part Coyote

Wolf Species Are Part Coyote

By | July 28, 2016

Genomic analysis reveals wolves and coyotes have hybridized, potentially complicating wolves' protection under the US Endangered Species Act.

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image: Classic Example of Symbiosis Revised

Classic Example of Symbiosis Revised

By | July 25, 2016

The partnering of an alga and a fungus to make lichen may be only two-thirds of the equation.

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image: Man and Bird Chat While Honey Hunting

Man and Bird Chat While Honey Hunting

By | July 25, 2016

A study suggests that humans and avians in sub-Saharan Africa communicate to find and mutually benefit from the sweet booty.

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More than half of the world’s land may have passed the threshold that threatens long-term sustainable development, researchers report.

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image: Donor-Soil Microbes Drive Ecosystem Restoration

Donor-Soil Microbes Drive Ecosystem Restoration

By | July 11, 2016

Excavating existing topsoil and adding donor soil, researchers revitalized degraded farmland in the span of six years.

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image: A New Role for Marine Archaea

A New Role for Marine Archaea

By | July 1, 2016

Researchers discover acetogenesis in archaea, suggesting an important role for these little-studied organisms in generating organic carbon below the seafloor.

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image: Archaea’s Role in Carbon Cycle

Archaea’s Role in Carbon Cycle

By | July 1, 2016

Bathyarchaeota undergo acetogenesis, generating organic carbon below the seafloor.

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image: Hot Off the Presses

Hot Off the Presses

By | July 1, 2016

The Scientist reviews Serendipity, Complexity, The Human Superorgasism, and Love and Ruin

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image: Marine Bacteria Share Carbon Assimilation Duties

Marine Bacteria Share Carbon Assimilation Duties

By | July 1, 2016

Taxonomic differences in bacterioplankton amino acid uptake

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image: Multicellular Cooperation Curbs Cheating

Multicellular Cooperation Curbs Cheating

By | July 1, 2016

An experimental evolution study shows that more cheaters arise when bread mold fungal cells are less related to one another.

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