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» photography and developmental biology

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image: Are Cancer Stem Cells Ready for Prime Time?

Are Cancer Stem Cells Ready for Prime Time?

By | April 1, 2012

A flood of new discoveries has refined our definition of cancer stem cells. Now it’s up to human clinical trials to test if they can make a difference in patients.

48 Comments

image: BeetleCam, Take Two

BeetleCam, Take Two

By | March 15, 2012

The BeetleCam is back! And this time, it’s lion proof. 

0 Comments

image: Lions Up Close

Lions Up Close

By | March 15, 2012

An armored, remote controlled contraption fitted with a camera snaps dangerously close pictures of lions in Masai Mara.

0 Comments

image: How to Make Eyeball Stew

How to Make Eyeball Stew

By | March 1, 2012

Editor's choice in developmental biology

0 Comments

image: Model Citizen

Model Citizen

By | March 1, 2012

With an eye to understanding animal regeneration, Alejandro Sánchez Alvarado has turned a freshwater planarian into a model system to watch.

2 Comments

image: How Tigers Get Their Stripes

How Tigers Get Their Stripes

By | February 22, 2012

For the first time researchers have demonstrated the molecular tango that gives rise to repeating patterns in developing animal embryos.

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image: Cell Change Up

Cell Change Up

By | February 9, 2012

Imaging cell cytoskeletons during early embryonic development leads researchers to uncover a new regulator of cell shape

3 Comments

image: Cyan Wonders

Cyan Wonders

By | February 1, 2012

In 1842, Anna Atkins, a 43-year-old amateur botanist from Kent, England, began experimenting with a brand-new photographic process called cyanotype or blue-print. 

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image: Botanical Blueprints, circa 1843

Botanical Blueprints, circa 1843

By | February 1, 2012

Anna Atkins, pioneering female photographer, revolutionized scientific illustration using a newly invented photographic technique.

0 Comments

image: Iron Builds a Better Brain

Iron Builds a Better Brain

By | January 9, 2012

Brain imaging and gene analyses in twins reveal that white matter integrity is linked to an iron homeostasis gene.

9 Comments

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