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image: Pharma Cooperates to Achieve Precision Medicine

Pharma Cooperates to Achieve Precision Medicine

By | February 1, 2017

The challenges of adapting drug development to the age of personalized therapies encourage collaboration among industry players.

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image: The Fungus that Poses as a Flower

The Fungus that Poses as a Flower

By | February 1, 2017

Mummy berry disease coats blueberry leaves with sweet, sticky stains that smell like flowers, luring in passing insects to spread fungal spores.

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image: May the Force Be with You

May the Force Be with You

By | February 1, 2017

The dissection of how cells sense and propagate physical forces is leading to exciting new tools and discoveries in mechanobiology and mechanomedicine.

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image: Restoring a Native Island Habitat

Restoring a Native Island Habitat

By | January 30, 2017

Removal of non-native vegetation from an island ecosystem revives pollinator activity and, in turn, native plant growth. 

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Using simulations, scientists report that a mixture of termites and plant competition may be responsible for the strange patterns of earth surrounded by plants in the Namib desert. 

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image: Image of the Day: Goodbye Colo

Image of the Day: Goodbye Colo

By | January 18, 2017

Colo, the oldest zoo gorilla and the first born in captivity, died on January 17 at age 60.

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image: How Plant-Soil Feedback Affects Ecological Diversity

How Plant-Soil Feedback Affects Ecological Diversity

By | January 13, 2017

Researchers examine how underground microbes and nutrients affect plant populations.

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image: First Bumblebee Species Declared Endangered in U.S.

First Bumblebee Species Declared Endangered in U.S.

By | January 11, 2017

The federal government concludes the rusty patched bumblebee is nearing extinction.

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image: Exploring the Epigenetics of Ethnicity

Exploring the Epigenetics of Ethnicity

By | January 11, 2017

Researchers attempt to estimate how much of the human genome’s methylation patterns can be attributed to genetic ancestry.

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image: Image of the Day: Saltwater Survivors

Image of the Day: Saltwater Survivors

By | January 9, 2017

When road deicing salt enters freshwater ecosystems, prey species such as Daphnia pulex can rapidly evolve tolerance to the contaminant, buffering their local food webs from the impacts of salination.

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